Monday, September 22, 2014

Speak The Truth Even If Your Voice Shakes





A recent blog post of mine offended some people.  For this I am sorry.  I have changed the blog post to not be so obvious to protect the "innocent".  

I will continue to speak out, however, when I see professional educators behaving in ways that hurt kids.  Kicking kids out of the library for playing games quietly during non academic times, tweeting hate filled statements, etc will continue to be things I write about and call people out for.  If you feel as if my posts are in error harness the power of your own voice and write your own blog post about the things you do to empower students.  

Will I admit when I am wrong?  Heck YES! See my post, I Was A Twit On Twitter.



Sunday, September 21, 2014

How To Create A Google Hangout Lower Third Custom Overlay: The EASY PEASY FREE Way!



Have you ever wondered how to make a customized lower third but found nothing but technical, photoshop based explanations?  Me too!

I finally figured out that you can make your own customized lower third very easy, free and without photoshop or being a photo editing genius! 

All you need is:
  • Pixlr Editor
  • Size of Hangout Screen- 640 x 360
  • A small image (200 x 50)
  • PicMonkey- if you need to resize an image
If you have any questions about how to create a customized lower third after watching the video please let me know.

What's Your #Jenniferism?



This summer at the ISTE Librarians Network Breakfast, Jennifer LaGarde caused the air to be sucked out of the room when she said during her keynote, in a room filled with librarians, that the Dewey Decimal System is not a life skill and that librarians shouldn't  spend valuable instructional time teaching it.

If you are not a librarian you are probably thinking, "What's the Dewey Decimal System?"  much to the chagrin of your Elementary, Middle and High School librarians who spent countless hours and volumes of worksheets teaching you the Dewey Decimal System.

If you are a librarian, the Holy Grail of all things library has just been relegated to a side note, thus, the massive loss of air in the room that morning.

I agreed with Jennifer's statement.  Way back in 1997 when I first moved from the classroom to the library I was annoyed at many of the things I was taught in "library school" and expected to "teach" in the library.  Have you ever seen those awful worksheets where kids have to draw a line to show where the book goes on the shelf?  How B O R I N G!



I determined back in 1997 that the library I organized would be a break from the rigors of the classroom, a place to talk, play games, help and learn. The library would be an oasis in the middle of worksheets, homework and tests.

Side note: I was told, upon stepping into my first library, that the teachers used going to the library as punishment when their classes didn't behave.  Punishment=if you don't behave in class I will take you to the library this week.  If students behaved then they didn't have to go to the library.  Yup! You read that right. Going to the library was a form of punishment.  Think those stupid worksheets had anything to do with that?

At the elementary level, in the library I ran, students rotated to activities in centers that included a game center, book center, music center, video center, research center (which NEVER used a worksheet), etc.  There were always carefully planned "lessons" in each center disguised as fun.  The center that students loved the most was the Library Helper Center.  Starting in the 2nd grade students in this center worked behind the circulation desk.  They checked books in, checked books out and put the books back on the shelf.  Because all the other children were working on their center activities I was able to work with the Library Helpers, teaching them how to put the books on the shelves correctly so that the books would be easy to find.  MUCH better than a worksheet because the skill wasn't taught out of context and they could see why having the books in a certain order was helpful.  

The library as oasis continued to be my theme as I moved to the high school level.  My concentration was to teach for relevance as well as give students a place to relax, regroup, socialize, and recharge (themselves & their devices) before heading back out into the world of academia.

One library I know of did the following:

There were times during the day in a newly 1:1 school, when students had a 'free' period or came in before their first class or waited for a ride after their last class.  These were all perfect times for students to unwind from the stresses and rigors of the school day.   The head librarian and her library aide, however,  would walk around the library and if they saw any student playing a video game or doing anything that was not directly linked to academics, they told them to leave the library.  Now keep in mind that the kids they were kicking out of the library had not been sent to the library to work on an academic assignment.  These students had CHOSEN to come to the library during their free time.  These students had earbuds/headphone on so that they were not being loud or disruptive.  This behavior on the part of the librarian and her aide turned my stomach.  What was the point of librarian and her aide in kicking students out of the library?  What message did this behavior send to the students about the library?

This year I started a new job as an Instructional Technology Facilitator.  It feels strange to not be in a library, but I am loving every day.  This past Friday, I pulled a Jennifer!  While teaching a group of English teachers how to use Google Classroom and Google Drive I mentioned that students could use Google Templates to pull up an MLA formatted Google Document, thus eliminating the headache of trying to format their own paper.  When confronted that students needed to know how to format MLA style on their own, I caused the air to be sucked out of the room when I replied that spending countless hours teaching students how to format their research papers/essays to MLA format was a waste of valuable instructional time and NOT a life skill.  The content and knowledge shown within the paper is the life skill that teachers should be focusing on.



This philosophy also applies to works cited.  Students no longer need to learn the excruciating, complicated, confusing foreign language of works cited.  Sites like EasyBib, Citation Machine, etc will make sure all your periods, commas, spaces, etc are in the right place.  What is the life skill learned with works cited?  Is it knowing when to use a comma, a period, indentation, underlined, italicized, etc?  OR is it knowing the importance of giving attribution to a source used in the paper?

Don't even get me started on the Reader's Guide To Periodical Literature!



My challenge to you this week is to take a hard look at yourself and your teaching practices.  Is there something you are teaching that is antiquated, unnecessary and NOT a life skill?  

Once you discover your Jenniferisms please share them on the Padlet below:




My dear friend Elissa Malespina created this great Infograph  about being a rebel in the library. Tweet us at #Jenniferism or add to the Padlet above to share ways you are a REBEL LIBRARIAN!



Friday, September 19, 2014

Two Weeks @ Elkmont & Beyond! September 8 - 19, 2014




Moving Forward at Elkmont!

Ms. Hardiman used Kahoot! with her students as a test review tool. The kids were completely into the game and learning at the same time! With Kahoot! teachers and students can create and play quizzes, discussions or even surveys using any device with a web browser… including a laptop, iPad, iPhone, iPod, Android, Chromebook, Windows Phone or PC and more.

Google Classroom is an awesome new resource for teachers, especially those in 1:1 or BYOD school like Elkmont. Ms. Horton, Ms. English & Ms. McMunn have bravely moved forward with learning Google Classroom & Google Drive and getting their students set up using their LCS GAFE account and connecting them to Google Classroom. The kids loved that they could carry on a conversation with their teacher in real time using the comments feature in Google. Students were also amazed that their teacher could see what they were typing! For teachers using Google Classroom there is no more papers without names, "I forgot bring my homework", "The dog ate my homework", etc. Teachers can see in real time their students progression throughout an assignment. Google Classroom is the ultimate formative assessment tool and relationship builder for teachers.

The Mathematics Department, Ms. Holt & Ms. McMunn tackled Khan Academy this week. For teachers, there is never any question as to how your students are progressing in math with Khan Academy. Once you become a coach in Khan Academy, teachers and coaches can access all of their students' data. You can get a summary of class performance as a whole or dive into a particular student's profile to figure out exactly which topics are problematic. The coach reports let coaches glance at their dashboard and quickly figure out how to best spend their time teaching. Khan Academy provides teachers with constant, real time feedback as to student progress which is a perfect formative assessment tool for the mathematics classroom.

Below are some introductory videos to both Google Classroom and Khan Academy. If you would like to get started with either of these technologies in your classroom please contact Ms. Nikki D Robertson to book a day and time.


Google Classroom Tutorials




Creating Assignments in Google Classroom (Step by Step Tutorial Coming Soon)

For a SlideShare Tutorial for Google Classroom click HERE.

Linda Lindsey has compiled a list of 12 of the BEST Google Classroom Tutorials HERE.





Elkmont Connects the Dots for International Dot Day


On Monday, September 15, 2014 Elkmont High School made their global mark by participating in International Dot Day. Ms. Tessa Hardiman's 5th grade classes participated in several different activities for Dot Day, but the activity they loved the most was connecting with other students around the country who were celebrating Dot Day too!

Using Skype and Google Hangouts, students from Alabama, Georgia and New Jersey connected and shared information about what makes their school and town awesome. It was exciting to watch as these kids connected, shared, learned and grew together during our Dot Day activities. One really fun thing we did using Skype was Mystery Skype.

Mystery Skype is a 45-60 minute critical thinking challenge that your class takes part in while Skyping with another class somewhere else in the world. Your students' goal is to guess the other school's location (country, state, city, school name) before they guess yours.

Learn more about Mystery Skype and other ways you can use Skype in the Classroom click HERE.

In addition to our fun with Skype, students also made Dot Day Trading Cards and recorded their dots using FlipGrid. Learn more about our Dot Day activities HERE.




Elkmont BYOD Gets A Boost With Google Classroom & Khan Academy


Mary Jane Hobbs empowered her students to become masters of their own learning this week by introducing them to Khan Academy. Khan Academy enables students to practice math at your own pace with our adaptive assessment environment. You can start at 1 + 1 and work your way into calculus or jump right into whatever topic needs some brushing up.

Each problem is randomly generated, so you never run out of practice material. If you need a hint, every single problem can be broken down, step-by-step, with one click. If you need more help, you can always watch a related video.

Teachers and coaches can access all of their students' data. You can get a summary of class performance as a whole or dive into a particular student's profile to figure out exactly which topics are problematic. The coach reports let coaches glance at their dashboard and quickly figure out how to best spend their time teaching.

Ms. Hobbs also got her students started on Google Classroom and Google Drive. Students no longer have to worry about losing a USB Stick, not being able to access an assignment because it is on their computer at home, etc.

Classroom is available to anyone with Google Apps for Education, a free suite of productivity tools including Gmail, Docs, and Drive.

Classroom is designed to help teachers create and collect assignments paperlessly, including time-saving features like the ability to automatically make a copy of a Google document for each student. It also creates Drive folders for each assignment and for each student to help keep everyone organized.

Students can keep track of what’s due on the Assignments page and begin working with just a click. Teachers can quickly see who has or hasn't completed the work, and provide direct, real-time feedback and grades right in Classroom.



Elkmont 5th Graders Collaborate With Google Drive


Ms. Missy Bailey's 5th grade students embraced the power of collaboration using Google Slides to work on their Project Based Learning presentation. The kids were so excited as they worked on groups on their MacBooks but on the same Google Slides. It was exhilarating to watch Ms. Bailey's students as they shared, talked, engaged and produced their PBL slides in Google.

One of my professional goals is to help teachers use technology as an efficient and effective tool for student learning instead of using it as an add on to the end of a traditional unit of study. Google Drive tools are well-suited for use as a starting point to help teachers begin to break the barriers of traditional methods of tech integration and design student driven learning experiences that require students to construct knowledge as they create, an idea supported by the Common Core State Standards (CCSS).

The features available in Google Slides make it a useful tool for helping students begin to develop digital literacy and engage in the types of learning experiences suggested by the Common Core. With Google Drive tools like Slides, technology and research are seamlessly integrated into the learning process as students are engaged in problem solving, critical thinking, communication and creativity.




Anytime Anywhere Anyplace Professional Learning


One great thing about technology is the ability to learn anytime anyplace...even in your PJs! Elkmont High School's Instructional Technology Facilitator, Nikki D Robertson, has been creating video tutorials for technologies taught to teachers and students. Additionally, Ms. Robertson offers this service for other technologies that teachers or students would like to learn. Watch our list of video tutorial resources to grow through out the school year HERE.




Do It Yourself Professional Learning


TL Virtual Cafe: Back To School Special - I always look forward to the beginning of a new season of TL Virtual Cafe.  I love that this awesome community gives everyone the opportunity to have a voice.  Be brave this year. Step forward, out of the stack and share with somebody, anybody, something great that you do in your library.  The more we share our story the more the public perception of libraries and librarian will change to a positive one.

#TLChat LIVE! Season Two- Season Two of #TLChat LIVE! tackled the topic of MakerSpaces in the Library.  The conversation was lively and the ideas shared provide all with something to take back to their schools to try.  

The #TLChat LIVE! Archive link click HERE

View a "Replay" of the chat via Nurph HERE




#GlobalTL: Librarians Without Borders- A Joyce Valenza production, #GlobalTL kicked off it's inaugural broadcast Thursday, September 18th with an all-star lineup of guests.  A great conversation regarding connecting, collaborating and librarians role in helping teachers with this took place.  If you missed the live broadcast you can watch a recording of the show below.


Saturday, September 20, 2014 at 12 pm ET

Have you ever wished that you had more time for hands-on work, collaborative projects, or labs during class? Perhaps you have heard about the Flipped Classroom concept, but weren't really sure what it is or if it could work in your classroom. In this webinar, you will learn not only what a flipped classroom is, but also how it can support Response to Intervention (RTI) Tier 2 and Tier 3 intervention strategies. Join Nikki Robertson as she shows how it fits within the Rigor/Relevance framework. As an example of what can be done, she will explore the Khan Academy and show ways in which their pre-made materials can be used in your Flipped Classroom. Lastly, she will share ways you or your students can produce customized Flipped Classroom materials from your own classroom.


EdCamp Atlanta: You Never Know What Will Happen!



This tweet from Andy Plemmons sums up EdCamp Atlanta!  You really just never know what is going to happen at EdCamp Atlanta or any other EdCamp because every EdCamp is different, yet the same.  Different because EdCamps are organically created on the day of the event by the participants who attend the EdCamp, thus making the experience and learning uniquely tailored to attendees, not contrived by what a school district thinks educators need to learn.  The same because the basic structure of an EdCamp is the same.  

Soapbox Alert:  Many schools and school districts have started what they are calling "EdCamp" professional development sessions.  These PDs often do not follow the EdCamp guidelines and often turn into the same boring and dreaded professional development that teachers hate and learn almost nothing from.  

The point of an EdCamp event is for it to be completely separated from any and all association with a school/district so that teachers can get outside of the school/district bubble and be exposed to new or different educational pedagogies. There should also be NO sessions or presenters planned in advance.  The point it to be completely participant driven.

EdCamp Atlanta prides itself on providing this for its attendees.  For the last three years, EdCamp Atlanta has provide a place where public, private, charter, home and university level educators can learn and connect with each other in a relaxed atmosphere ripe with learning opportunities.  

If you attended EdCamp Atlanta this year please add your reflections to our EdCamp Atlanta FlipGrid HERE.

Did you miss the EdCamp Atlanta SmackDown?  Check out all the cool resources shared by EdCamp Atlanta attendees HERE.

We need your help!  EdCamp Atlanta moves venues every three years.  This was Woodward Academy's last year to host EdCamp Atlanta.  We are extremely grateful to WoodWard Academy for opening their doors to us.  If your school would be willing to host EdCamp Atlanta 2015 please contact Wanda Hopkins McClure or Nikki D Robertson.  

Want to be a part of planning EdCamp Atlanta 2015?!  We would love to have you on board! Contact Wanda or Nikki to volunteer! 

EdCamp Atlanta sponsors were incredibly generous this year.  Without their contributions we would not have been able to provide breakfast, lunch or door prizes to attendees.  Please take a moment to thank our sponsors.





#iCONNECT Tech Tips Newsletter for Elkmont High School


Sunday, September 14, 2014

Is Your 1:1/BYOD Implementation REAL or "The Emperor's New Clothes"?



"But he hasn't got anything on," a little child said.



"Did you ever hear such innocent prattle?" said its father. 



And one person whispered to another what the child had said, 
"He hasn't anything on. 
A child says he hasn't anything on."

"But he hasn't got anything on!" the whole town cried out at last.



Scenario One:  

School District Technology Director sends out an email asking if _______ should be blocked or allowed under 1:1/BYOD Initiative that has already been rolled out.

Question:

Is this school district actually wearing "new clothes" or are they buck naked?

Scenario Two:

School District Technology Policy cannot be found on school district website and when asked for a copy of the school district policy one cannot be provided.

Question:

Is this school district actually wearing "new clothes" or are they buck naked?


Scenario Three:

School District rolls out a 1:1/BYOD implementation yet blocks all all forms of collaborative interaction (Skype, Google Hangouts, Social Media, etc) 

Question:

Is this school district actually wearing "new clothes" or are they buck naked?

Scenario Four:

School District has already or is preparing to rollout a 1:1/BYOD Initiative yet is only concerned with what device to purchase.  No thought is given to academic support, professional development,  curriculum, data and assessments, infrastructure, etc.

Question:

Is this school district actually wearing "new clothes" or are they buck naked?

Scenario Five:

Your school district has failed to understand the meaning of "Least Restrictive Environment" and have filtering set so high  that virtually no websites can come through, thus,  rendering the devices in your 1:1/BYOD virtually useless.

Question:

Is this school district actually wearing "new clothes" or are they buck naked?


Scenario Six:

School District has already or is preparing to rollout a 1:1/BYOD Initiative and hasn't taken the Project 24 self assessment to ensure they have all necessary components in place for a successful 1:1/BYOD Initiative rollout.

Question:

Is this school district actually wearing "new clothes" or are they buck naked?





Making decisions regarding your 1:1/BYOD Implementation through emails as situations and questions arise is just Bass Ackwards planning and based on extensive research by Project 24, will result in a 1:1/BYOD that fails or at the very least fails to meet the true intent of a 1:1/BYOD Implementation.  Even more bass ackwards is having no District Technology plan in place BEFORE rolling out your 1:1/BYOD Implementation.




Blocking virtually all forms of collaborative interaction like Skype, Google Hangouts, Social Media and other similar sites sets your 1:1/BYOD Initiative up for failure just like what happened with the iPad rollout in Los Angeles.  

Any 1:1/BYOD Initiative that fails to truly embrace the higher levels of the SAMR Model, especially Redefinition, which is all about collaboration and connecting students with others around the world, is simply investing money into a device that will do nothing much beyond what a piece of paper and pencil can accomplish.  

Project 24 is a MUST for any school district whether they have already implemented a 1:1/BYOD Initiative or are considering implementing a 1:1/BYOD Initiative.  The Project 24 framework helps districts address seven key concepts: academic supports; budget and resources; curriculum and instruction; data and assessments; professional learning; technology and infrastructure; and use of time.  Three easy steps to participating include (1) signing up; (2) assembling a team; and (3) taking the free self-assessment on which a confidential, customized report will be generated. Upon review of a district’s confidential report, it is up to district leaders to make the most of the resources that are available. 

School districts that want to continue posturing or saying, "This blog isn't about us. Our 1:1/BYOD is fine just like it is" should put their money where their mouth is and take the Project 24 self assessment. What do you have to lose?  Either you will prove that your district's 1:1/BYOD is top notch OR you will have an extremely valuable guide to assist in getting your 1:1/BYOD up to snuff. 

I've known a school district who was part of Project RED that puffed their chest and patted themselves on the back for being innovative and cutting edge that, in reality, was anything but.  In fact, many Project RED schools were used as examples of what NOT to do as well as what to do when Project 24 gathered data from over a thousand 1:1/BYOD schools to create their self assessment.  

Conducting a serious evaluation of your 1:1/BYOD Initiative is not only a win-win for your 1:1/BYOD Initiative but, more important, will lead to a 1:1/BYOD Initiative that is effective, engaging and empowering for the students you serve.








Friday, September 5, 2014

This Week @Elkmont & Beyond! September 2-5, 2014



This week has been an incredibly busy and rewarding week.  

Digital Passport Initiative Deployment:



Elkmont High School came back from the holiday weekend to the much anticipated Digital Passport Rollout Day. Piloted by Wendy Brightman at Blue Springs Elementary School last year, the Limestone County Schools Digital Passport Initiative was rolled out county wide this school year. Students have spent the month of August working through Digital Citizenship Modules to ensure they know how to be safe online. Students have also learned the basic use and care of their new MacBook Air laptops.

Elkmont High School started out our DPI Rollout Day by having classes come in one at a time to pack their laptops and charging cables into their laptop bag. Students logged into their laptops so that we could troubleshoot early in the day any log in issues that might exist.

Student aides from the high school helped move the laptops to the gym where a stage was set up for presenting the laptops to students "graduation style". In addition to the laptops, Digital Citizenship Certificate of Completion were also prepared, rolled and tied with a red ribbon.

At 1:00 all 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade students filed into the gym and the ceremony began. Mr. Garris started by saying a few words and leading the pledge. Dr. Sisk then gave a brief speech about the Digital Passport Initiative and the learning opportunities that will now be available to them. Next, Ms. Pat Gartman took the stage. Calling one class at a time, Ms. Gartman read out the names of each student. As students proceeded across the stage they first received their laptop from their teacher and then their certificate of digital citizenship from Mr. Garris. When all laptops had been distributed, the 3rd and 4th grade classes posed with administration for group photos. Students then proceeded to the lobby area of the gym where Elkmont's wonderful PTSO had cookies and juice for the students. Our PTSO also spearheaded ordering covers for the MacBook Airs and delivered many of those to the students in their classrooms.

After getting snack courtesy of the PTSO, students went back to their classrooms for the last hour of the day. 3rd and 4th grades teachers had a variety of activities planned for this last hour. Ms. Adams jumped right in and taught her students how to use AirDrop. Ms. English got her students started taking pictures of themselves in preparation for learning about AirDrop. Other teachers walked their student through how to find the Elkmont High School website and how to log into their Moodle accounts.

Their were a few bumps in the road along the way but in the end, with the help of SwitchDesk, parent volunteers, student aides, teachers and administrators everything worked out in the end.

Take a look below at all the fun we had during Elkmont's DPI Deployment Day!





Building PLCs at Elkmont:

This week grade level/departmental PLC Teams began meeting to start developing a technology plan of action for their PLC and for individual teacher PLP requirements under EducateAlabama.

The 5th Grade PLC meet this week and set using Google Classroom with their students as their September PLC and PLP goal. To help support this goal, Ms. Robertson created Google Classroom tutorials and has set up dates and times to co teach using Google Classroom.

Step by Step Picture Tutorials:



For a SlideShare Tutorial for Google Classroom click HERE.

Linda Lindsey has compiled a list of 12 of the BEST Google Classroom Tutorials HERE.





Google Classroom:

Thursday, September 5, 2014 Ms. Robertson and Ms. Hardiman spent the first three periods of the day teaching students how to access their Google Classroom account. The students where very excited as they saw the ability to communicate in real time with their teacher on assignments shared through Google Classroom, worked on a shared Google Spreadsheet, and discovered the lifesaving and telling Restore History feature in Google Drive documents.

We learned several things during our day together, the most important was listening and following directions. This may seem obvious but the need to listen and follow directions is especially critical when using technology. Even one tiny little period out of place will cause frustration on the part of the person trying to get to a website or accomplish a technology task. Having completed this activity successfully, I am confident these students will be more apt to listen and follow directs next time now that they truly the the immediate effects of not doing so.

We also learned to support and help each other. This goes a long way in having a cohesive classroom and building positive classroom relationships. We were cheering so loud for our fellow classmates as they worked diligently to type in the URL perfectly that Ms. Adams stuck her head in the door to see what we were doing to have so much fun!

As a reward for successfully completing the lesson objectives for the day, students used the last 10 minutes of class to play with Photo Booth and Incredibox.

Ms. Hardiman and her students were awesome and patient as we worked through the inevitable kinks that pop up when using new technologies. I can't wait to see what they do with Google Classroom now that they know how it works!


EdCamp Atlanta:

With a little over a week before our third EdCamp Atlanta, organizers meet via Google Hangouts to finalize plans for the big day.  

EdCamp Atlanta just gets bigger and better every year.  We have an amazing group of sponsors who have provided us with the means to provide our attendees with delicious breakfast and lunch as well as an amazing array of door prizes.  Please find and support our sponsors HERE.

One super fun part of the EdCamp Atlanta lunch time will be getting a keepsake picture courtesy of TapSnap.  I first learned of TapSnap during ISTE's #EdTech Karaoke Party when Elissa Malespina and I got silly.


EdCamp Atlanta is also going to have a MakerSpace area featuring robotics courtesy of Hummingbird Robotics, Sphero and Little Bits.  

EdCamp Atlanta session boards will also look a bit different as well.  We will still have 25 and 50 minutes sessions but with the distinction of See, Learn Do sessions and Round Table Discussion session.  

Start the EdCamp Atlanta fun a day early at the EdCamp Atlanta TweetUp.  We will enjoy great company, meeting friends face to face, see amazing and functional classroom furniture and enjoy light refreshments and drinks at Dekalb Office in Alpharetta, Ga on Friday, September 12, 2014 from 6-8 pm ET.  

#iCONNECT Tech Tips Smore


Monday, September 1, 2014

September is Here! September is Here!



I am so excited about September finally arriving!  Besides the start of high school and college football (War Eagle), September also hails the return of the TL Community! Woo Hoo!

Whether  you are a school librarian or not, open up your calendars and mark these dates from now through May/June 2015.


TL Virtual Cafe:  1st Monday of each month at 8 pm ET

                             
Free webinars specifically geared towards the professional learning needs of school librarians.
                           
September 8, 2014-Back To School Special with Jennifer LaGarde, Gwyneth Jones,  Tiffany Whitehead



#TLChat LIVE!:  2nd Monday of each month at 8 pm ET

Join this Twitter Chat each month to Connect, Share, Learn & Grow with other school librarians just like you.

September 15, 2014- Topic of discussion is voted on each month! Join in!



TL News Night:   3rd Monday of each month at 8 pm ET

This is a LIVE show presented in news show format featuring a Wrap up of “This Month in School Libraries” and deeper discussion of topical school library issues with special guest experts. Did we mention it was LIVE?

September 22, 2014- TL News Night welcomes the Association of Indiana School Library Educators (AISLE)



Want to go GLOBAL with your professional learning?  Join Joyce Valenza and her friends for a brand new adventure with Global TL: Librarians Without Borders!  The inaugural GlobalTL Fall Kickoff Event is Thursday, September 18, 2014 at 8 pm ET.